EXECUTIVE NETWORKING WITH TENANT ADVISORY GROUP


Executives networking event with TAG

Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Lunch, attendees were prompted with the question, “Some of our best referral sources can be existing clients. What do you do to stay in front of your current client base?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Thanks again for taking the time to attend and please remember to follow up with those you might have synergies with. A rising tide lifts all boats!

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC: I have found that by offering value such as the opportunity to meet other business owners and potential clients, they will show up. Asking a business owner how you can best support them is a wonderful way to go from vendor to partner.”

Ian Stevenson, Partner, Straight North: Reminder in the calendar every 6 months to touch base.”

Morrie Elstien, President, MorrieCONNECT: How can I help you grow your business and who can I connect you with? Best way to get a payback is to give something upfront. They need to ask how they can help you back.

Randy Bridgeman, Partner, Perkins Coie: Getting out of your office and meeting your clients and going to networking events with them. Have a proactive relationship with your clients.

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group: Focus on what you can do to support other people. Do a value add newsletter and video. “What can I do to help you?”

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman CPAs: Leave an audience with something they can take with them. Get engaged with committees and organizations.

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank: Making strategic introductions for clients to help them grow their business. I try to get together quarterly in person, but a phone call works if needed. Have speakers and host events.

Gary Parenti, CFO, Worsek & Vihon: guest of Jonathan Rothstein: Do lots of writing and put good information out there. Don’t do much electronically on purpose. Try to keep personal service as much as possible.

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners: View yourself as a partner rather than a vendor. Bend over backward for each client and do whatever you can do for them.

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of Business Development, Vault Innovation Group: Have quarterly panel sessions for clients to speak in front of their other clients.

Ed Grasse, Managing Partner, Busse, Busse & Grasse: Stay ahead of the law and let clients know he is on top of it.

Rasheed Hammouda, CEO, BridgeFT: Need a scalable way to stay in front of clients. Need to consistently deliver value to clients.

Justin Frick, co-owner, AV Chicago: Reaching out to clients when new product offerings, new ideas and new clients who are doing something cool. Knowing customers and have that personal touch.

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC: Write blogs and small articles that may be of interest to them. Follow up with emails and telephone calls.

Stephen Beriau, Managing Director, Encina Business Credit: Stay in front with good information.

Erryn Cobb, CEO, Fetch IMC: 30% of revenue was from referrals from existing clients. Offer a referral fee to clients who refer them.

Eric Masi, President, Torque Digital Marketing: Post something on LI that’s both business and personal.

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace: Make introductions for clients. Hosts quarterly events focused on different industries. Write articles and white papers. Reach out with a survey at each stage of the project.

Scott Simpson, Owner, Scott Simpson Builders: Have a 3-year warranty that keeps them in front of their clients.

Mark Mann, Managing Partner, Mann Weitz & Associates: In touch with clients once a month for advice. Give out referrals to attorneys, insurance and wealth advisors.

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who are interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

Guest List

Gary Parenti, CFO, Worsek & Vihon – guest of Jonathan Rothstein

Dan Yost, Principal, Employee Benefit Consulting Group – guest of Bill Himmelstein

Mike Olson, Director of Acquisitions, DecisionOne Dental – guest of Bill Himmelstein

Mark Mann, Managing Partner, Mann Weitz & Associates – guest of Barbara Best

Scott Simpson, Owner, Scott Simpson Builders – guest of Morrie Elstien

Ian Stevenson, Partner, Straight North – guest of Morrie Elstien

Randy Bridgeman, Partner, Perkins Coie – guest of Morrie Elstien

Stephen Beriau, Managing Director, Encina Business Credit – guest of Morrie Elstien

Eric Masi, President, Torque Digital Marketing – guest of Ruth Minnick

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman CPAs

Ed Grasse, Managing Partner, Busse, Busse & Grasse – guest of Stefanie Jenkins

Justin Frick, co-owner, AV Chicago – guest of Jeff Asperger

Rasheed Hammouda, CEO, BridgeFT – guest of Tim Schumm

Erryn Cobb, CEO, Fetch IMC

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace

Morrie Elstien, President, MorrieCONNECT

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of Business Development, Vault Innovation Group

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC

Elkhorn, WISCONSIN. I-43 AND SOUTH 67


Elkhorn, WISCONSIN. I-43 AND SOUTH 67 Layout

Description: A 10.5 acre property is available for development. The property is 10 minutes from Lake Geneva and Lake Delevan. The nearby area has over 100,000 full-time residents with over 300,000 visitors per year. The adjacent business park has over 4,500 visitors per day, and the traffic count for I43 is 22k per day and for route 67 it is 9k per day. The site will feature a Love’s Travel Center, as well as a Fairfield Marriott hotel with 70 rooms. It is a great opportunity for a restaurant and other retailers to cater to the Marriott and Love’s guests, as well as the industrial park traffic.

Size: 10.5 acres

Location: Elkhorn, Wisconsin. I-43 and South 67.

Understanding Costs Associated With Moving to a New Space


glass commercial building Reflection

When you’re looking for a new space, having a budget is essential. As you check out potential locations it’s important to understand the not-so-obvious costs that may pop up as you transition to your new place.

Parking

Just as we mentioned in our location blog, understanding parking is an essential part of running a business. Depending on the area you’re looking to move to, parking can be a lot more expensive than you initially thought. If a significant percentage of your employees are driving to work and parking, you may be able to make a deal with a nearby garage so your team has the resources to get to work easily.

The Lease

Before signing the dotted line on your new lease, you should understand every associated cost. You’ll be locked into this lease for an extended period of time, so it’s of the highest importance to know exactly what that means for you and your business. There will be a security deposit required which is typically 30% of your landlord’s out of pocket expenses, and additional fees for utilities not included, after-hours HVAC use, and possibly janitorial services. There may also be termination penalties if for any reason you were to break your lease earlier than expected.

New Furniture

Different spaces call for different furniture, and what you have on hand may not always work in your new office. If you’re adding collaborative spaces or just expanding from your old office, it’s necessary to budget for any additional furniture you may need. Furniture can range anywhere from $15 to $25 per square foot, so It’s a good idea to take note of what furniture would translate to the new location and what pieces you would need to purchase.

Mover’s Insurance

If you decide to use a moving company to get everything from Point A to Point B, you’ll want your items to be protected. Buying an insurance policy to cover the cost of all the items you’re bringing to your next space can save you a lot of hassle if anything were to get damaged or lost. While purchasing insurance may be a little more costly upfront, ensuring the protection of your assets will give you peace of mind during your move.

Phone and Data

There’s an expense associated with wiring your space, getting your data hooked up, and potentially getting a new phone system. Often times even when a landlord commits to turnkey a space, the cost to setting up the wiring may not be included.

Phone and data wiring and set up fees start at around $2 per square foot and depending on factors like how many workstations you have, the types of ceilings you have, etc, it can go up to about $5 per square foot. Also, there can be a lag time from when you call to set up your internet service and when it actually commences. So be sure to start this process as early as possible.

A discrepancy with your budget can push back your move and set you behind. Take the time to look into any extra costs that could come up, and budget for the unpredictable. This strategy will ensure that money will not inhibit your big move.

Choosing the Best Location for Your Office


Selecting the perfect location for your office is no easy task. It is vital to consider factors that will satisfy clients as well as employees. Keep in mind these important elements when searching for your new office location.

Accessibility

You want a space which clients can find easily and employees can comfortably commute to – perhaps close to public transportation or with a parking lot if many clients and employees will drive to reach you. Consider where your key employees live and whether the space is convenient for them.

Proximity

Think about what sorts of amenities you’d like in the surrounding area. Are there restaurants nearby for client meetings or are you close to any green space your employees can utilize to unwind and stay active? While the inside of your space is incredibly important, the area you’re located in provides an important first impression of your business.

Proper Spacing

If you have multiple offices, it’s imperative to understand what the commute between the two spaces will be like. Just as it’s important to have accessible transportation from your home to your office, it’s also important to secure a location that ensures an accessible commute amongst your various office locations.  

Strategic Partners

Take note of potential partners in your desired location. Situating your new office within a hub relevant to your industry can make all the difference in the ease of your partnerships and business deals. You are who you surround yourself with, so make sure you’re seeking spaces that work hard for your company.

Cultural Fit

Community culture means a variety of things depending on the area in which you’re looking. It’s essential to understand what role your business will play in the local culture. Does this culture align with your company’s values? What role would your company play in this community? Assimilation into your area is a necessity for success in your new location.

While there are many things to consider when choosing a location for your office, it all boils down to figuring out what your company needs to succeed and choosing a location that fits those ideals.

Where you work matters. That’s why we’ve partnered with an online software platform to make it easy to search for spaces that are specific to your needs. All you need to do is enter your information here, and you will be given access to a database of office space listings complete with virtual tours, floor plans and all-in monthly prices. Finding the space of your dreams is only aclick away.

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Breakfast, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are your best practices for business development?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Bill Himmelstein – The best practice for business development for me has been doing business development for others.

Gary Breden – Relationships are the best means for developing businesses. Setting up channel partnerships.

Keith Glantz – Over-deliver with quality and then clients become the salespeople. Looking into the EOS model.

Jay Sharman – Best sales have been one degree of separation. I get most new clients organically by asking clients. I failed miserably when spending money on marketing.

Paola Meinzer – Focus on relationships. Be a part of different groups and be engaged in those groups.

Bill Gimbel – It’s not about selling. It’s about servicing and providing value. The ultimate compliment from a client is a referral. You should ask for the referral.

Ken Daemicke – Networking. Chambers, Rotary, NFP boards. Get involved. Ask: “How can I help you?”

Dominic Rinaldi – Using your phone works! Calling an owner of a business has been the most effective practice for business development. I use a CRM system and mine the data. If under $10m, around 2x-5x of adjusted EBITDA. The owner needs to stick around to transition relationships.

Zori Haouchine – Personal connections have been the most important. I want to focus on doing the things I want to do.

Paul Pagel – Growth through software wave. Started based on relationships. You can’t scale care. I did it through employee ownership. I want to transition to a team running the company.

Ben Olson – Channel partnerships like PE firms, they’re great people to work with. I want to get people together more.

Michael LaVista – Our marketing is excellent deliverables. 70% of our business is from other software companies. I’m going to write a book this year.

Charlie Franklin – I join and participate in organizations.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who are interested in attending future TAG events, please

email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List

Keith Glantz, President & Chief Creative Officer, Glantz Design

Jay Sharman, CEO/Founder, TeamWorks Media

Paul Pagel, CEO, 8th Light

Bill Gimbel, President, LaSalle Benefits

Michael LaVista, Founder & CEO, Caxy Interactive

Steve Brown, President Stratego, Partners

Zori Haouchine, Founder & Creative Director, ZOHA Architecture & Design

Jay Sharman, Founder & CEO, Team Works Media

Dan Dooley, CEO, Morris Anderson

Mike Olson, Director of Acquisitions, DecisionOne Dental

Domenic Rinaldi, Managing Partner, Sun Acquisitions

Ken Daemicke, Partner, Mueller

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman

Ben Olson, Founding Partner, Faircourt Partners

Charles Franklin, Managing Partner, Franklin Law Group

Jay Page, Co-Founder, CEO, Grey Street Capital

5 Things to Consider When Searching For A New Office


Modern coworking office interior

Relocating and choosing a new office space is a lot of work, no matter the size of your company. However, it also provides an exciting opportunity to start fresh in a new space. Carefully consider the following points to ensure you get the most out of your move.

Location

Select a location that works for both clients and employees. You want a space which clients can find easily and employees can comfortably commute to – perhaps close to public transportation or with a parking lot if many clients and employees will drive to reach you. Consider where your key employees live and whether the space is convenient for them.

Cost

Find a space that doesn’t stretch your finances too thin. Make sure to calculate the full cost of the space and consider any hidden costs carefully to make sure nothing sneaks up on you (parking, utilities, any necessary construction, taxes, phone & data set up, janitorial, new furniture, etc).

Physical Space

Look for a space that will allow room for growth. Opt for a space that could potentially accommodate a growing team or evolve with your business. Also, check that any new space has sufficient area to allow for breaks and group or client meetings.

Infrastructure

As you evaluate your options, look for a space with easy-to-use and secure IT systems, particularly if you need a reliable internet connection for your business to function properly. Understand and test the current technological infrastructure of each space you consider to ensure it can accommodate your business needs or if a potentially expensive build-out may be required.

Employee Needs  

Think about what amenities you’d like your new space to offer employees. Sunshine can be a great easy perk as access to natural light can affect mood, energy levels and alertness. See if your new location has space for a stocked beverage center or coffee bar. Also, consider investing in employees’ health with an on-site fitness center or dedicated wellness room.

Where you work matters. That’s why we’ve partnered with an online software platform to make it easy to search for spaces that are specific to your needs. All you need to do is enter your information here, and you will be given access to a database of office space listings complete with virtual tours, floor plans and all-in monthly prices. Finding the space of your dreams is only aclick away.