Executive Networking With Tenant Advisory Group


Executive Networking Event

Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During one of April’s Executives Breakfasts, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are your tips for managing time?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group – Prioritize what’s important, and schedule everything you can. Delegate what you’re not good at to focus on what you enjoy most and are best at.

Vickie Rock, Principal & CS/RPR, Victoria Legal + Corporate Services – Schedule what’s important. Utilize time blocking.

Trisha Daho, Founder & CEO, Empowered – 1. Be fully engaged in whatever you are doing at the moment. 2. Only check your email 3x a day max. 3. Time blocking- get 3 blocks of 50 minutes a day to work on things that matter most. Create absolute boundaries and walls around those increments.

Pradeep Kandimalder- Focus on a mission and vision for a day. Group things to organize your email.

Carl Utz, Director of Sales & Sr. Account Manager, Andromeda Technology – You can’t do everything yourself.  You need to delegate to people who can do the job better.

Brian Black, Relationship Development Manager, Tenant Advisory Group – Everyone is busy but are we getting things done? Time batching has been huge. Be intentional on how you want to feel at the end of the day.

Dr. Ari Levy, Founder & CEO, Shift – What are the metrics that matter? Personally and professionally. How are you spending your energy? Are you showing up for what matters? That which you measure improves. Your mind and body seeks to create patterns. Be ruthless about your weaknesses and be open to asking for help. Learn how to embed the right habits that get the right results.

Craig Evans, President, Precision Healthcare Consulting- Know when to get away from work to recharge your batteries.

Greg Topel, CBO, Tanvas – Every moment is precious. In the first stages of being an entrepreneur I was a servant to everyone. Ask yourself: Is this something I can do later — do I need to do it right now? Fold that into priorities of what absolutely needs to get done today.

Cathy Jama, Executive Vice President, Tenant Advisory Group – You need me time. For me, Friday is admin day.  It’s important to look ahead and plan ahead, so I minimize how often I look at emails.

Terry Hush, CEO, Roji Health Intelligence- I’m a huge delegator.  I used to do it all myself and then had an awakening when writing the company blog.  I went from scheduling days and goals on spreadsheets and became the email deletion queen. I cultivate leadership rather than managing.

Paul Detlefs, President and EOS Implementer, The Prestwick Group, Ltd. – I do not allow technology in sessions. You have to control the technology rather than it controlling you. Also, have a quarterly or at least annual planning pulse-  for your business, departments and personally for your long term vision and plans. Weekly planning discipline is critical. Get an assistant so you can elevate yourself to your unique abilities that you enjoy doing and are good at.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List

Paul Detlefs, President and EOS Implementer, The Prestwick Group, Ltd.

Terry Hush, CEO, Roji Health Intelligence

Cathy Jama, Executive Vice President, Tenant Advisory Group

Greg Topel, CBO, Tanvas

Craig Evans, President, Precision Healthcare Consulting

Dr. Ari Levy, Founder & CEO, Shift

Brian Black, Relationship Development Manager, Tenant Advisory Group

Carl Utz, Director of Sales & Sr. Account Manager, Andromeda Technology

Pradeep Kandimalder

Trisha Daho, Founder & CEO, Empowered

Vickie Rock, Principal & CS/RPR, Victoria Legal + Corporate Services

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group

Executive Networking With Tenant Advisory Group


Executives Luncheon

Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During one of March’s Executives Luncheons, attendees were prompted with the question, “What’s the biggest mistake you’ve made and how did you overcome it?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC: I gave too much credence to people and was being too nice. Don’t let people take advantage of you.  Be slow to hire and quick to fire. Be polite and respectful and compliment when appropriate, including adversaries.

Bill Bast, Principal, Thornton Tomasetti: The biggest mistake I made was to start my own business. I did it too young and went home to PA to do it. Don’t give 100% at the office and have nothing left to give others like your loved ones.

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of BD, Vault Innovation: I have the tendency to over promise. No matter what you’re doing in family, business or life, figure out what you bring to the table and be that person. Your mission is to create and connect so that other people are empowered.

Lee Travers, CEO, iammoney: Not being present.

Tim Roach, Co-Founder & CEO, Lendr: You have to understand how to fail fast, recover and understand the process of how to recover. Define what success is to you. Knowledge is power and so is having core values as a company. Live them. Understand vision. I utilize 5 year plans. Not 10 year plans. Profitability is key.

Muhammed Azfar, Managing Partner, Auctus Group INC: Hire people with values that align with yours. Be slow and methodical about hiring and quick to fire. Hire for value. Values train for skill and strategies train for choices.

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners: I went from leading a team of 10 to leading a team of 70. I brought the same approach to all the team members and when I individualized my approach, I had much better results. Always put yourself in other people’s shoes.

Kate Winston, Agency Lead, Strategy & Growth, envisionit: I said no to a big ad agency and was the right hand person for owner of the agency. I was told “Sometimes a C+ is just fine.”- that offended me, but she was right. Know when it needs to be an A and know when it can be a C.

Erryn Cobb, Founder & CEO, Fetch IMC: Don’t wear too many hats. Invest in key team member’s professional development sooner. I followed my dad’s example: There’s no gray between right and wrong. Set a standard to live by.

Bernie Dyme, President and CEO, Perspectives LTD: I didn’t allow myself to make mistakes. It’s ok to make mistakes as long as you learn from them. Gratitude is very important. Teach your children gratitude.

Daniel Porcaro, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Porcaro Stolarek Mete Partner, LLC: I left a lot on the table when I sold my first large business. I could have grown it larger myself. 25% of customers provide 90% of revenue. Last 50% of clients provides less than 4% of revenue. Fire bottom 50% of clients. With extra time, over serve the top 50% of your clients. Then you care about A clients and A prospects.

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank: Delegating needs to happen and you need to focus more on your team and sense of urgency. Be slow to promote and manage expectations of employees. Life work balance. Never ask anybody to do something you wouldn’t or couldn’t do yourself. Everyday try and do a kind gesture and leave the world a better place.

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman & Co CPA: Working in corporate America I did not keep a balance in my life. I gave all my time to the company. Be yourself. Don’t try and be anyone else. Embrace who you are.

Jerry Doorhy, Partner, J.J. Doorhy & Associates: My biggest mistake was waiting too long before going on my own. You’re never too important to mop the floor. You get more bees with honey.

Morrie Elstein, President, MorrieCONNECT: Start understanding how valuable the people you know are. Pay it forward. You never know what’s going to come back.

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Erryn Cobb, Founder & CEO, Fetch IMC

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Daniel Porcaro, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Porcaro Stolarek Mete Partner, LLC

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace

Morrie Elstein, President, MorrieCONNECT

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of BD, Vault Innovation

Bernie Dyme, President and CEO, Perspectives LTD

Tim Roach, Co-Founder & CEO, Lendr

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman & Co CPA

Kaitlyn Hedger, Associate General Agent Assistant, Midwest Legacy LLC

Terri Crittenden, CEO, Fredman Design Group

Kate Winston, Agency Lead, Strategy & Growth, envisionit

Jerry Doorhy, Partner, J.J. Doorhy & Associates

Lee Travers, CEO, iammoney

Bill Bast, Principal, Thornton Tomasetti

Muhammed Azfar, Managing Partner, Auctus Group INC

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners

 

 

How to Create a Chicago Center of Influence


Due to an influx in technology, Chicago is awash with small to midsize businesses trying to make their mark on the city. These companies may have great reputations in their home cities, but doing business in Chicago is its own beast. The key to setting yourself apart as a business owner in Chi-Town is to go the extra mile. Not only should you be providing top-notch services, but you should also be a center of influence. The longer you spend in the Windy City, the more you’ll begin to realize it’s a city founded upon community, tight-knit neighborhoods and personal recommendations. With all of that in mind, here’s how to get down to business the Chicago way.

Build an authentic network. Your network is a direct representation of you and your business, so it’s important to cultivate your professional circle with care. But how do you build an impeccable network? Make it personal. It’s obvious when someone is networking just to add another connection to their LinkedIn profile. Chicagoans build networks on authentic relationships which is why you need to not only take a vested interest in a person’s business, but also them as a person. When your intentions are genuine, your network will begin to fall into place.

Offer up your network. The first step in creating lifelong working relationships with a client or someone in your professional circle is to provide the best service within your industry. From there, you set yourself apart from your competitors by offering up the impeccable professionals you have in your network. Identify people in your circle who are great at what they do and refer them to people who need those services. In Chicago, the best way to get business is to send business, but you have to be intentional. Creating a solid reputation for you and your business is a marathon not a sprint, and there’s no better way to create a lasting impression than making a thoughtful introduction.

Show up.  Connections continually need to be maintained. Like we mentioned above, you won’t get anywhere in Chicago by creating surface-level relationships. Keeping a strong professional circle is more than just referring business to each other — you have to make yourself available. Represent your brand by looking up events and places your network is attending or hosting and show up. If you become an active supporter of your network, you can expect that same support to be reciprocated when you need it.

Utilize these tips to make the most of your business’ presence in Chicago, and if you’re in need of a new office space to get your move started, let us know how we can help.

Executive Networking With Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Bruncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During March’s Executives Bruncheon, attendees were prompted with the question, “What do you to do build stronger relationships?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Atish Doshi- I send articles that help me connect with people. I also try and remember how I met each person.

Dave Norris- I approach relationships differently depending on the person. I will ask for a receipt of a family dinner or upgrade a team member on the airplane. You have to keep employees involved. For clients, start with providing a good service, but it’s also important to spend as much time as possible with them, ie a round of golf.

David Wiers- I’m a fan of lifelong learning and challenging teams to grow and learn both personally and professionally. I also do the same for my clients.  I focus on culture and taking care of my people internally and externally.

Bill Himmelstein- With meeting 8-10 business owners every week, I had to do something to stay in front of everyone while adding value and not being salesy. I created the monthly executives bruncheon and luncheon as a way to bring the best people in my network to meet each other and learn through a topical discussion.

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees and interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Carl Utz, Partner, Andromeda Technology Solutions

Martha Bell, Principal, Tilton, Kelly + Bell

Joel Wilcoxen, Former CFO, Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago

Atish Doshi, President, Founder, Black Sheep

Brad Farris, Founder & CEO, Anchor Advisors

Liz Tilatti, CEO, ZipFit Denim

Mike Perich, CEO, Sewing Supplies Division of Bernina International

Mike Levin, Owner, Total Insurance Services

Dave Norris, COO, RedRidge Finance Group

Scott Glickson, Partner, McGuire Woods

David Wiers, Founder & CEO, Satori Energy

Brian Stumm, Partner, Stumm Insurance

Andy Mack, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, SnapMobile

Daniel Wang, CEO, Jexet Automation

Jon Wunderlich, President, Nyco Products Company

Kim Stapleton, Founder & CEO, The Network Effect

Alicia La Hoz, Founder & CEO, Family Bridges

Emily Lonigro, CEO & Founder, LimeRed

Lucas Ward, Co Founder & CTO, Kin

Jill Kerrigan, Founder & CEO, JAK Creative Design

Jamie Horn, CEO, Horn Design

Sherrin Ross Ingram, CEO- International Center for Strategic Planning, Vistage Chair, Chairman of the Board- DuPage Housing Authority Of Counsel- Tressler LLP

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During February’s Executives Luncheon, attendees were prompted with the question, “What new technology is disrupting your industry and how do you plan to adjust or take advantage of it?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Olivia Nelligan, CEO, Nasco: Education has not progressed with the tech times. On the health care side many problems and mistakes can be attributive due to lack of communication. Developing AI to help with communication. Many point to tech as the underlying problem but oftentimes it might be the business itself.

Jordan Katz, President, JR Katz: Tech has been elusive to the insurance industry. Now some tech in underwriting to speed up the process and make better predictions. Need tech to accelerate the process.

Stephanie Jenkins, Director, BD of Vault Innovation Group: AI and machine learning is big disrupter. Is there an ROI to build AI into their app or technology.

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group: Technology is disrupting financial services as it creates lots of criminals. It’s also pushed down margins to make things better and cheaper. Indexing now popular as it changes the way people invest. Now people can be more efficient, optimize a portfolio and protect against making bad decisions.

Mike LaVista, CEO, Caxy Interactive: Machine learning and AI has been the opportunity. It’s almost always hype. Everyone wants blockchain. Every 3 years something comes along that changes the way we do business. Used to do mobile app development and now everything is web based.

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees and interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Ann Brennan, Founder, Brennan Executive Benefits

Thomas McMenamin, Vice Chairman, Masuda Funai

Kimberly Anderson, Managing Partner, Anderson & Boback

Mike Black, Mortgage Advisor, Michael Black Group

Olivia Nelligan, CEO, Nasco

Jordan Katz, President, JR Katz

Andy Hulett, Founder & Partner, EmPowerHR

Erryn Cobb, Founder & CEO, Fetch IMC

Geoffrey Waguespack, Partner, Butler Weihmuller Katz Craig

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of BD, Vault Innovation Group

Dave Stolarek, Partner, PSM

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman & Co CPA

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


This Executives Breakfast inspired a number of great discussions and offered Chicago business leaders the opportunity to broaden their networks.

At the Executives Breakfast, attendees discussed “Is there a defining moment or decision you’ve made that has helped shape your career?” Here are the responses:

Jill Kushner Bishop, PhD, Founder & CEO, Multilingual Connections: Wanting to start a business for a while but had a comfortable position. HR director had made some unethical decisions and she spoke out and was given resignation later. Was Named Evanston business person of the year!

Jaclyn Moser, Partner, Harken Interiors: Was helping facilitate creative work and wasn’t getting the right fit from the current job. Wasn’t being fulfilled. Seeing the fruits of their labor.

Brian Black, Relationship Development Manager, Tenant Advisory Group: When he met Bill, he felt he was a genuine guy. When spoke with Mark Meyer he suggested a lane change for his career.

Matt Field, President, Express Employment Professionals – Used a recruitment firm and it was a terrible experience.

Chris Sommers & Jaclyn Moser, Founders & Partners, Harken Interiors: Getting paired up with Jaclyn and seeing how well they worked together.

Nanette McCarthy, Principal Partner, Griffin McCarthy & Rice: It started from previous employment and she met her partner there. She saw that the client’s best interest was not being met. She and her partners started their own firm to put their client’s best interests first.

Robert Natke, Partner, UrbanWorks: Just graduated from architectural school. He went back for an MBA and that changed his approach to architecture.

Max Adelman, State Farm Insurance Agent, Max Adelman State Farm: He was premed at home for break. His family told him to not be a doctor.

Joe Blandford, CEO, Greatline Communications: Had a job and got a new boss. His boss was a difficult person to work for and he left. After surviving cancer, he changed perspective. He has 4 daughters.

Cathy Jama, Executive Vice President, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC: Had a meeting with Bill and is now working with the TAG team. Surround yourself with positivity.

Laurel Bellows, Founding Managing Partner, Bellows Law Group, P.C. & Past President, American Bar Association: Met her future husband and current law partner. She wanted to be a trial lawyer when women weren’t allowed to be lawyers. He was looking to train a woman to be a trial lawyer. Who stands in front of a jury and builds a relationship within 30 seconds, a man or a woman?

Percy Haley, Partner, Black Rhino Financial GroupF: Decided to switch careers from banking. Prayed about it and he met his partner Darryl.

Jamie Horn, Partner, Digital Experience and Marketing Recruiting: Her dad never encouraged her to get into the business. She did an internship in commercial real estate and came out of school in a recession.

Chris Salvi, Co Founder, Salvi Media: Interviewing a glioblastoma caretaker. Made him realize the power of the story.

Amber Autumn, VP of Business Development, Summit Design & Build: Her dad was a brick mason and he took her to jobs. When she was 8, her dad said do you want to go to work with me or stay home with your mom and clean the house?

Dane Sanders, Director of Capital Markets, Black Rhino Financial Group: Wife, and 3 kids were the defining moment. A client said you really helped me.

Rick Sudekum, Managing Partner, Sudekum, Cassidy & Shulruff: when some younger partners came to him and convinced him to start a new firm. Living values. 10 commandments. Do unto others.

Mark Meyer, Founder, E&M Strategic Development: Was a banker at Associated. Had a cushy job. He was approached by someone to go to straight commission and left salary. He has started 7 different businesses since. He cames back to relationships and began doing the right things. Do what you say you’re going to do.

Ivan Vislavskiy, Co-Founder and CEO, Comrade Web Agency: inspired by his old boss. He loved him and thought very highly of him. He wanted to be like his boss. Decided needed balance in his life.

Chuck Gullet, Managing Broker, Best Chicago Properties: Has 13 yrs at Caterpillar. The moment of clarity was during Pearl Jam at Lollapalooza. Realized he needed to move to Chicago.

Cyrus Rivetna, Principal, Rivetna Architects Inc: Was doing everything for his business and took the plunge and hired his first employee. Changed his mentality that he can delegate. If you’re not enjoying what you’re doing, you’re doing the wrong thing.

 

Guest List:

Max Adelman, State Farm Insurance Agent, Max Adelman State Farm

Laurel Bellows, Founding Managing Partner, Bellows Law Group, P.C. & Past President, American Bar Association

Tim Van Mieghem, Partner, Proaction Group

Dave Norris, COO, RedRidge Finance Group

Chuck Gullet, Managing Broker, Best Chicago Properties

Amber Autumn, VP of Business Development, Summit Design & Build

Laura Dribin, CEO & Founder, Peritius Consulting

Dane Sanders, Partner- Director of Capital Markets, Black Rhino Financial Group

Max Adelman, CEO, Max Edelman State Farm

Joe Blandford, President, Greatline Communications

Matt Field, President, Express Employment Professionals

Chris Sommers & Jaclyn Moser, Founders & Partners, Harken Interiors

Percy Haley, Partner, Black Rhino Financial Group

Jill Kushner Bishop, Ph.D., Founder & CEO, Multilingual Connections

Nanette McCarthy, Principal Partner, Griffin McCarthy & Rice

Andy Mack, Co-Founder & Managing Partner, SnapMobile

Chris Salvi, Co-Founder, Salvi Media

Robert Natke, Partner, UrbanWorks

Rick Sudekum, Managing Partner, Sudekum, Cassidy & Shulruff

Jaclyn Moser, Partner, Harken Interiors

Brian Black, Relationship Development Manager, Tenant Advisory Group

Joe Blandford, CEO, Greatline Communications

Cathy Jama, Executive Vice President, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC

Jamie Horn, Partner, Digital Experience and Marketing Recruiting

Mark Meyer, Founder, E&M Strategic Development

Ivan Vislavskiy, Co-Founder and CEO, Comrade Web Agency

Cyrus Rivetna, Principal, Rivetna Architects Inc

EXECUTIVE NETWORKING WITH TENANT ADVISORY GROUP


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Lunch, attendees were prompted with the question, “Some of our best referral sources can be existing clients. What do you do to stay in front of your current client base?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Thanks again for taking the time to attend and please remember to follow up with those you might have synergies with. A rising tide lifts all boats!

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC: I have found that by offering value such as the opportunity to meet other business owners and potential clients, they will show up. Asking a business owner how you can best support them is a wonderful way to go from vendor to partner.”

Ian Stevenson, Partner, Straight North: Reminder in the calendar every 6 months to touch base.”

Morrie Elstien, President, MorrieCONNECT: How can I help you grow your business and who can I connect you with? Best way to get a payback is to give something upfront. They need to ask how they can help you back.

Randy Bridgeman, Partner, Perkins Coie: Getting out of your office and meeting your clients and going to networking events with them. Have a proactive relationship with your clients.

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group: Focus on what you can do to support other people. Do a value add newsletter and video. “What can I do to help you?”

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman CPAs: Leave an audience with something they can take with them. Get engaged with committees and organizations.

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank: Making strategic introductions for clients to help them grow their business. I try to get together quarterly in person, but a phone call works if needed. Have speakers and host events.

Gary Parenti, CFO, Worsek & Vihon: guest of Jonathan Rothstein: Do lots of writing and put good information out there. Don’t do much electronically on purpose. Try to keep personal service as much as possible.

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners: View yourself as a partner rather than a vendor. Bend over backward for each client and do whatever you can do for them.

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of Business Development, Vault Innovation Group: Have quarterly panel sessions for clients to speak in front of their other clients.

Ed Grasse, Managing Partner, Busse, Busse & Grasse: Stay ahead of the law and let clients know he is on top of it.

Rasheed Hammouda, CEO, BridgeFT: Need a scalable way to stay in front of clients. Need to consistently deliver value to clients.

Justin Frick, co-owner, AV Chicago: Reaching out to clients when new product offerings, new ideas and new clients who are doing something cool. Knowing customers and have that personal touch.

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC: Write blogs and small articles that may be of interest to them. Follow up with emails and telephone calls.

Stephen Beriau, Managing Director, Encina Business Credit: Stay in front with good information.

Erryn Cobb, CEO, Fetch IMC: 30% of revenue was from referrals from existing clients. Offer a referral fee to clients who refer them.

Eric Masi, President, Torque Digital Marketing: Post something on LI that’s both business and personal.

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace: Make introductions for clients. Hosts quarterly events focused on different industries. Write articles and white papers. Reach out with a survey at each stage of the project.

Scott Simpson, Owner, Scott Simpson Builders: Have a 3-year warranty that keeps them in front of their clients.

Mark Mann, Managing Partner, Mann Weitz & Associates: In touch with clients once a month for advice. Give out referrals to attorneys, insurance and wealth advisors.

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who are interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

Guest List

Gary Parenti, CFO, Worsek & Vihon – guest of Jonathan Rothstein

Dan Yost, Principal, Employee Benefit Consulting Group – guest of Bill Himmelstein

Mike Olson, Director of Acquisitions, DecisionOne Dental – guest of Bill Himmelstein

Mark Mann, Managing Partner, Mann Weitz & Associates – guest of Barbara Best

Scott Simpson, Owner, Scott Simpson Builders – guest of Morrie Elstien

Ian Stevenson, Partner, Straight North – guest of Morrie Elstien

Randy Bridgeman, Partner, Perkins Coie – guest of Morrie Elstien

Stephen Beriau, Managing Director, Encina Business Credit – guest of Morrie Elstien

Eric Masi, President, Torque Digital Marketing – guest of Ruth Minnick

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman CPAs

Ed Grasse, Managing Partner, Busse, Busse & Grasse – guest of Stefanie Jenkins

Justin Frick, co-owner, AV Chicago – guest of Jeff Asperger

Rasheed Hammouda, CEO, BridgeFT – guest of Tim Schumm

Erryn Cobb, CEO, Fetch IMC

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace

Morrie Elstien, President, MorrieCONNECT

Stefanie Jenkins, Director of Business Development, Vault Innovation Group

Bill Himmelstein, Founder & CEO, Tenant Advisory Group, LLC

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Breakfast, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are your best practices for business development?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Bill Himmelstein – The best practice for business development for me has been doing business development for others.

Gary Breden – Relationships are the best means for developing businesses. Setting up channel partnerships.

Keith Glantz – Over-deliver with quality and then clients become the salespeople. Looking into the EOS model.

Jay Sharman – Best sales have been one degree of separation. I get most new clients organically by asking clients. I failed miserably when spending money on marketing.

Paola Meinzer – Focus on relationships. Be a part of different groups and be engaged in those groups.

Bill Gimbel – It’s not about selling. It’s about servicing and providing value. The ultimate compliment from a client is a referral. You should ask for the referral.

Ken Daemicke – Networking. Chambers, Rotary, NFP boards. Get involved. Ask: “How can I help you?”

Dominic Rinaldi – Using your phone works! Calling an owner of a business has been the most effective practice for business development. I use a CRM system and mine the data. If under $10m, around 2x-5x of adjusted EBITDA. The owner needs to stick around to transition relationships.

Zori Haouchine – Personal connections have been the most important. I want to focus on doing the things I want to do.

Paul Pagel – Growth through software wave. Started based on relationships. You can’t scale care. I did it through employee ownership. I want to transition to a team running the company.

Ben Olson – Channel partnerships like PE firms, they’re great people to work with. I want to get people together more.

Michael LaVista – Our marketing is excellent deliverables. 70% of our business is from other software companies. I’m going to write a book this year.

Charlie Franklin – I join and participate in organizations.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who are interested in attending future TAG events, please

email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List

Keith Glantz, President & Chief Creative Officer, Glantz Design

Jay Sharman, CEO/Founder, TeamWorks Media

Paul Pagel, CEO, 8th Light

Bill Gimbel, President, LaSalle Benefits

Michael LaVista, Founder & CEO, Caxy Interactive

Steve Brown, President Stratego, Partners

Zori Haouchine, Founder & Creative Director, ZOHA Architecture & Design

Jay Sharman, Founder & CEO, Team Works Media

Dan Dooley, CEO, Morris Anderson

Mike Olson, Director of Acquisitions, DecisionOne Dental

Domenic Rinaldi, Managing Partner, Sun Acquisitions

Ken Daemicke, Partner, Mueller

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman

Ben Olson, Founding Partner, Faircourt Partners

Charles Franklin, Managing Partner, Franklin Law Group

Jay Page, Co-Founder, CEO, Grey Street Capital

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Luncheon, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are some of your best practices for finding new clients?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Pete Horvath – Word of mouth is the biggest growth. Meeting with property managers, realtors, and real estate owners.

Dan Porcaro  – Build a culture of selling. Encourage all team members to network, sell and get in front of others. Everyone does it.

Jonathan Rothstein – When you serve as a trusted advisor, you can help your clients with great service providers. Always do good work and keep clients’ best interests at heart.

Ruth Minnick – Networking is extremely important. It’s a lifestyle. Connect on a personal level. Follow the money. Follows hiring patterns. M&A. Funding.

Jennifer Nemec – How to be of service. All work comes from referrals and website lead gen. Doesn’t do any marketing.

Marie Hale – Teach sales as a culture. Sales is simply being the best service to the person sitting across from you.

Jeff Asperger – Following up and following through.

Luca Lanzetta – It’s about the service you provide. Become a client of who you want to do business with.

Tim Schumm – Follow up is so important. Have systems and processes in place to make sure you stay on top of the follow-up. Much business comes on 5th or 7th touch.

Anne Gehring – Using Hubspot which is free as a CRM. Helps with follow up.

Barbara Best – Develop strong personal relationships with clients and understand how to help them be successful in their careers. Focus on paying it forward. Publishing.

Dan Golden – Was all referrals for the first 6 years. Would get work from large agencies who couldn’t do what they did. Use Hubspot as it supports keeping in touch with people. Leverage tools to stay top of mind. Referrals still drive a majority of their deals. Started a referral program. Not being afraid for asking for the referral. I also us a platform called Gaggle.

Eric Wasson- Sales is the most important thing. As far as channel partners it’s the best way to sell. Biggest mistake was saying no to Salesforce partnership in 2004. A Salesperson is hardest to hire and hardest to fire.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who is interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Dan Porcaro, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Porcaro Stolarek Mete Partner, LLC

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners

Pete Horvath, Leprechaun, Move-tastic

Mason Awtry, CEO, Rightsize Facility

Marie Hale, Co-Founder & CEO, Revenue

Jim Lencioni, President, ARIA Group Architects

Rasheed Hammouda, Co-Founder, Bridge Financial Technology

Anne Gehring, Founding Partner, Stanton Blackwell

Luca Lanzetta, Founder & CEO, Luca Lanzetta LLC

Pete Horvath, President, Move-Tastic

Dan Golden, Co-Founder, BeFoundOnline

Eric Wasowicz, Investor/Advisor, Greenbrier Group

Jennifer Nemec, Founder & Chief Creative Office, Ideation Studios

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Eric Wasson, Director, Customer Logistics, Ryder Supply Chain Solutions