Up-And-Coming Chicago Neighborhood Guide


Class commercial building

Move over Fulton Market, we have some new players ready to take the spotlight. The Southwest Loop, South Loop and Old Town are hot with activity and ready to make their mark. Check out what makes these three contenders a dream for investors, commuters and brokers alike.

Southwest Loop:

It’s no secret that Chicago’s loop is making big moves in commercial real estate. But contrary to past developments, there is a small sleepy corner of the loop making a name for itself. Billions of dollars are being poured into this corner of the loop from projects such as The 78 megadevelopment which boasts a $5 billion dollar price tag, a new red line stop and three new roadways. Not to mention the complete rebuild of the Old Main Post Office and renovations happening in the Willis Tower. With all of this new activity, it’s projected that major players and their thousands of employees will soon find their place in this up-and-coming corridor.

South Loop:

This isn’t South Loop’s first time making its name on CRE broker’s lists everywhere. Around 2015 the South Loop was the “it” neighborhood of Chicago, and while it has managed to continue growth over the years, other neighborhoods like Fulton Market have taken over the spotlight. With potential developments such as the proposed mixed-use development near Soldier Field, Tenant Advisory Group predicts that 2020 will be the year that South Loop sees a resurgence in commercial real estate development, especially in the wake of the aforementioned Southwest Loop Corridor boom.

Old Town:

The new is being brought to Old Town. Known for its rich history and being home to Second City, Old Town has a historical charm that can’t be beat. But it’s not just the existing developments that make this classic Chicago neighborhood part of our up-and-coming areas, it’s the new developments that seem to keep popping up. Office spaces are finding their home in Old Town as well as a new multi-step development with three highrises: the Old Town Park Phase 2. This development is the second highrise in a three-step plan that will eventually hold around 500 residents, a parking garage and new commercial space.

A commonality between some of these projects is a focus on enhancing not only the surrounding areas, but also the accessibility, efficiency and ease of public transportation. It seems that in the coming years commuters will find enhanced public transportation and an easier commute. Which developments are you most excited to see?

A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Commercial Real Estate


Beginner's Guide to Investing in Commercial Real Estate-min

Investing in commercial real estate is a great way to diversify your portfolio as well as make some extra money. Unlike stocks and bonds, commercial real estate is a hard asset that provides income via rent collection and, in most long term cases, an appreciation of value. The best way to begin investing in commercial real estate is to thoroughly research your options – we’ve compiled a few tips to help you get started.

What is Commercial Real Estate?

Investing of any kind requires a good amount of research and before taking the plunge you should understand what commercial real estate encompasses. Office buildings are the most commonly known category of commercial real estate, but it also includes apartment complexes and high rises, retail strip centers, industrial buildings such as warehouses and special purpose spaces like amusement parks, hotels and sports stadiums. Once you have an understanding of what commercial real estate is, then you can devise a plan to invest.

Be Patient

Investing in real estate should not be about the short term. It should be about the long term and building equity. Everyone wants to make a quick buck, but investing takes time. Before investing in a plethora of properties, start small and take on a just one or two investments that you are certain will cover any associated costs you have – like the mortgage, taxes and operating expenses. Keep in mind how much you can charge for rent, and from there, weigh the amount of loans you would need vs your projected income after all expenses are taken out to make the best decision.

Understand Hidden Costs

Make sure to do your due diligence and understand the real estate taxes on the property, the condition of the property, and what kind of financing your lender will provide. Additional costs such as renovations, licenses/permitting, and vacancies can arise during the investing process. By keeping your properties leased up, there are tremendous tax and cash flow advantages real estate ownership can provide.

Make Sure to Have the Right Advisors

To make the most of your commercial real estate investments, work with industry experts. Before signing your name or committing to any property, seek out the guidance of a knowledgeable broker who can show you properties that may not be listed, and advise you on locations that will be the most fruitful for your investment. Work with an attorney to ensure that there are no legal issues with your potential investment. By failing to work with an attorney, you could suffer financially if any unknown legal issues arise. Finally, set up a discussion with a lender before you begin looking into properties to get a better idea of your borrowing guidelines and a realistic understanding of what properties you can afford.

By doing the right research, understanding your financial situation and working with industry experts, you can start investing in commercial real estate knowing you made the best decision for your financial well-being and portfolio.

Here’s When You Should Walk Away From a Deal


Here's When You Should Walk Away From a Deal-min

Negotiating a deal for an office space, home or retail space is a delicate art that takes thoughtfulness, precision and a clear idea of what you want. Walking away from a deal is not only the best leverage to get everything on your list of asks, but can also be necessary if the deal is headed in a direction that’s not in your best interest. Here’s how you can determine when it’s time to walk away.

When You Lose Focus of Your Original Goal

When looking for a new office space, it’s not uncommon to get caught up in a particular space or location and get lost in the idea of it. For instance, perhaps you’re on the hunt for a new office space in an attempt to shorten the commute for your employees. In the process, you happen upon an office space you love at a reasonable price, but it’s nowhere near where most of your employee base is located. If the original goal was to alleviate the commute for your team, and you end up looking at a potential office space that isn’t in alignment with that, no matter how nice it is or how many amenities it may boast, it’s best to take a step back and reevaluate why you decided to search for a new space in the first place. This is also the type of thing that can happen when you are looking to save money by reducing your square footage, but then start looking at nicer and higher class properties than you were in before. If the per square foot price becomes higher than you were paying before, you may end up taking a smaller space without any real cost savings.

When the Risk Far Exceeds the Potential Gain

Searching for the perfect location can be exhausting, especially when you have a large list of necessities. After a few less than impressive viewings you might be tempted to start to lower your standards. If you find yourself in a position where there are a laundry list of maintenance issues or you’re not 100% comfortable with the lease term the landlord is insisting on, it’s better to err on the side of caution rather than taking a risk that may negatively impact you in the end.

When It’s No Longer a Win-Win Scenario

If a potential landlord is using your interest in the property as a bargaining chip in their favor, rethinking the deal and even walking away from it could be in your best interest. For example, if the person on the other side of the negotiation gets emotional, is making threats, or is lying to you, this should tell you that you do not want to get further involved with these people even if the property you found hits all of your wants and needs. Remember, this will potentially be your landlord for years to come. In this situation it’s also beneficial to work with an experienced broker to ensure that you aren’t being taken advantage of in the negotiation process or setting yourself up for a frustrating leasing situation.

At the end of the negotiation process, you should feel good about the deal you signed, and by utilizing your ability to walk away, you can ensure that your lease and space are both tailored to your exact needs.

The Importance of Infrastructure


High View of Chicago's Skyline

Paying attention to infrastructure means paying attention to the nitty gritty details, but it’s these details that save you time and money in the long run. Below we have your guide to all things infrastructure for your new office space.

Movable Partitions and Furniture

As your business changes size and scope, having appropriate accommodations will make this transition seamless. Movable partitions and furniture are an easy and cost-effective way to accomodate for the expansion of your business. Seeking infrastructure that lends itself to the incorporation of movable additions is an imperative way to adequately plan for your company’s future.

Internet Connectivity

We all run on wifi these days, and your new building should be able to support that need for the entire office. Infrastructure plays a huge role in how easy or challenging it may be to set up your necessary systems. The difference between fast and effective wifi and internet that drags can be in the way your space is designed. Before you commit to a space, have the landlord run a network test on existing channels to ensure they work properly. If any of the cablings needs to be restructured, it could turn into a more costly project.

Security Systems

Ensuring the safety of your employees and important information is crucial. Consider if the space you’re looking at has a doorman or if there’s already a security system. If the security system needs to be updated or if one needs to be installed, this could turn into a costly and expensive project. Be on the lookout for existing security and how that aligns with what you need to ensure the safety of your employees and company assets.

Utilities

It’s easy to overlook things like sprinkler systems or outlets. If the sprinkler systems don’t function properly, you’re putting your employees at risk and either you or your landlord will be required to replace them. As for electricity, it’s recommended that you ask your landlord to run an electricity survey to gauge how much electricity your office space is using. Understanding the efficiency of your electricity and utilities can save you time and the surprise of higher-than-expected utility bills.

The inside of your new location is just as important if not more than the actual physical location. Weigh the pros and cons of location and infrastructure to narrow down the types of office locations you’re considering.

Where you work matters. That’s why we’ve partnered with an online software platform to make it easy to search for spaces that are specific to your needs. All you need to do is enter your information here, and you will be given access to a database of office space listings complete with virtual tours, floor plans and all-in monthly prices. Finding the space of your dreams is only aclick away.

Understanding Costs Associated With Moving to a New Space


glass commercial building Reflection

When you’re looking for a new space, having a budget is essential. As you check out potential locations it’s important to understand the not-so-obvious costs that may pop up as you transition to your new place.

Parking

Just as we mentioned in our location blog, understanding parking is an essential part of running a business. Depending on the area you’re looking to move to, parking can be a lot more expensive than you initially thought. If a significant percentage of your employees are driving to work and parking, you may be able to make a deal with a nearby garage so your team has the resources to get to work easily.

The Lease

Before signing the dotted line on your new lease, you should understand every associated cost. You’ll be locked into this lease for an extended period of time, so it’s of the highest importance to know exactly what that means for you and your business. There will be a security deposit required which is typically 30% of your landlord’s out of pocket expenses, and additional fees for utilities not included, after-hours HVAC use, and possibly janitorial services. There may also be termination penalties if for any reason you were to break your lease earlier than expected.

New Furniture

Different spaces call for different furniture, and what you have on hand may not always work in your new office. If you’re adding collaborative spaces or just expanding from your old office, it’s necessary to budget for any additional furniture you may need. Furniture can range anywhere from $15 to $25 per square foot, so It’s a good idea to take note of what furniture would translate to the new location and what pieces you would need to purchase.

Mover’s Insurance

If you decide to use a moving company to get everything from Point A to Point B, you’ll want your items to be protected. Buying an insurance policy to cover the cost of all the items you’re bringing to your next space can save you a lot of hassle if anything were to get damaged or lost. While purchasing insurance may be a little more costly upfront, ensuring the protection of your assets will give you peace of mind during your move.

Phone and Data

There’s an expense associated with wiring your space, getting your data hooked up, and potentially getting a new phone system. Often times even when a landlord commits to turnkey a space, the cost to setting up the wiring may not be included.

Phone and data wiring and set up fees start at around $2 per square foot and depending on factors like how many workstations you have, the types of ceilings you have, etc, it can go up to about $5 per square foot. Also, there can be a lag time from when you call to set up your internet service and when it actually commences. So be sure to start this process as early as possible.

A discrepancy with your budget can push back your move and set you behind. Take the time to look into any extra costs that could come up, and budget for the unpredictable. This strategy will ensure that money will not inhibit your big move.

How to Find the Right Office for a Fast-Growing Startup


Street Level Office

The rapid growth of a startup causes changes to come quickly, which makes it challenging to find an office space that will grow with the business. When beginning the search, consider the projected growth, business plan and the needs of the company to find the best suitable space.

Growth

Young companies experiencing hockey stick growth will quickly find themselves with an overcrowding issue, especially if they didn’t plan ahead during the search. Plan for an extra 10 – 20 percent of space to prevent overcrowding in the future. In doing so, you’ll save money by avoiding lease termination fees, as well as eliminate the hassle and expense of subleasing and seeking a larger space before the lease expires.

Landlord

Being able to grow within a building or a landlord’s portfolio is extremely important. Seeking space in a smaller building, like the ones typically found in River North and River West, can be quite limiting, especially as many of those landlords only own one property. Leasing from a larger landlord, like the ones found in the Loop, provides a tremendous amount of flexibility when the time comes to expand. A larger building, or office portfolio, allows that landlord to easily relocate a growing tenant to accommodate their expanding space needs.

Location

Real estate will always be about location. When finding the right office for a startup, consider where it’s located in proximity to employees, current clients, potential clients and vendors. Remember that if the space is out of the way, it will make it difficult for prospective clients to find the business. Location also plays a role in employee retention and morale, as well as talent acquisition.

Needs

When launching a new company, one important aspect is the cultivation of its culture and the office needs to reflect and reinforce it. A financial services startup may need a more structured environment with more private offices and sound proofing. Whereas a creative firm will want an office with more open spaces for collaboration. Additionally, confirm if the space will be able to accommodate the specific needs of an industry. For example, a company with heavy IT needs will want a space that is able to power and protect all of the equipment.

Finding the right office for a startup will build a solid foundation for future growth and success. Remember that having an experienced commercial real estate broker involved from the beginning of the process will save both time and money. Tenant Advisory Group has worked with a variety of growing startups and is happy to share how they have successfully handled the needs of budding businesses.

The Best Negotiations Come from a Complete Commercial Real Estate Team


Commercial Real estate agent and customers shaking hands together celebrating finished contract after about home insurance and investment loan, handshake and successful deal. 5 Reasons to Work with a TAG Broker

Negotiating the terms of a commercial real estate lease is difficult, as it is fraught with jargon, clauses and paperwork, and even the slightest misstep can have dire consequences for a business’s bottom line. Hiring the right real estate broker and attorney team to handle this delicate process is the best way to guarantee the most favorable terms while saving you time and money.

They Understand the Industry

Too often, a business owner will request help in negotiating lease terms from an attorney friend or a neighborhood real estate agent. However, these professionals may not be familiar with the industry-specific ins and outs of a commercial real estate lease. A dedicated real estate attorney/commercial broker team will review the terms of the lease with expert eyes, navigating the provisions and clauses to establish the final document.

They Can Ask for More

Real estate is a hyper-local specialty, meaning an experienced commercial real estate attorney/broker team is going to have market knowledge regarding tenant improvement allowance and rent abatement. The team will understand where to push back and what is fair for the market. This will result in a far less contentious negotiation, establishing a good rapport with the landlord from the beginning.

They Can Strategize

There are many ways to “get more” out of your lease, and only professionals working in the industry would even know to ask. For example, the lease renewal clause is a point of concession that can greatly benefit your lease terms down the line. A commercial real estate attorney/broker team will work together to create a plan that will include more than simply lower rental costs.

When working with Tenant Advisory Group, we have access to a deep bench of quality connections, including top-tier real estate attorneys to help achieve the best results possible.

Appropriate Pricing Moves Properties


Glass and brick commercial building

Listing a property for the highest possible price may seem like the best course of action, but more often than not it will deter buyers and negatively affect the final sale price. Establishing the price in line with comparable properties in the area, or slightly lower, will help move the property faster with less cost to the seller.

Silent Expenses

Rather than focusing on the final sale price, keep in mind the cost of NOT selling the property. When a listing sits on the market for months, it accrues ongoing caring costs like maintenance, property taxes, rent, etc. Holding out for a higher sale price can actually net a lower gain in the end. There can be a heavy cost to owning a property.

Timing is Everything

Identifying the right buyer is more than finding who wants to pay the most. It’s also about moving the property in a timely manner. When presented with a purchaser who wants to buy now but at a lower price than someone who wants to wait six months but at a higher price, it can be more beneficial to sell sooner than to hold out for more money. If you wait for the buyer with the longer timeline, you’re accruing costs the entire time. Additionally, it’s important to remember there’s no guarantee the potential sale won’t fall through.

Best Way to Maximize Value

Selling a property can become quite complicated, and most business owners don’t have enough time to dedicate to the process. To get the most value out of the deal, it’s recommended to enlist the services of an experienced commercial real estate broker. These professionals possess market knowledge and experience to help sell a property for the best price in the shortest amount of time.

Pricing the property correctly saves time, which saves money in the long run. Remember to stay informed on every aspect of the deal, from pricing to concession, as this will ensure you’re comfortable with your sale.

How to Spot a Desirable Landlord


Tall glass infrastructure

The landlord is an integral part of the commercial real estate leasing experience, which is why this person or entity needs to factor into any final decisions. A lot can be revealed about a landlord by the way they handle the negotiation process, as this is a window into how they treat existing tenants. For example, someone who tries to use bait-and-switch tactics isn’t going to change once you become a legally-bound renter! An easy way to tell a good landlord from a bad one is to identify if they value quality tenants over maximized profits.

Communication is Key

Good landlords are transparent and responsive, especially when they want you as a tenant. Ideally, a future landlord will stay in communication regardless of the situation, providing explanations for any lapses in response. Remember, there are most likely other deals in process that may prevent you from winning the space. However, a worthwhile leasing professional will work with a prospective renter to find a different available space.

Well-Capitalized is Ideal

When a landlord has a large amount of money to negotiate with, they are referred to as “well-capitalized.” There are a variety of reasons why a landlord is flush with capital, such as a recently refinanced building, or having a REIT or sovereign wealth fund as owners. Regardless of the source of funding, this means they are able to offer larger concessions in the form of free rent or tenant improvement allowances. In addition to incentive packages, well-capitalized landlords are able to invest more money back into improving the building. Independently-owned operators typically don’t have access to the large amount of funds needed to pay for a tenant’s buildout or even fix ongoing problems properly or in a timely manner.

Professionals are Best

Tenant Representatives are generally well liked by successful landlords as they work with all parties involved to ensure terms are met, stipulations are understood and proper channels are followed. The quality of business a tenant representative brings to the table – high-quality ancillary professionals – often encourages landlords to make more concessions on a deal with either a current or new tenant.

However, short-sighted landlords can become concerned about paying a broker to renew a tenant or acquire new business. These owners don’t take into account the long-term benefits, rather than the short-term costs. It demonstrates a potential unwillingness to pay to keep the building in good shape, repair the elevator or HVAC or clean the windows and building. If a landlord pinches pennies now, they will surely react poorly down the road when something doesn’t go their way.

The lowest price option is not always the best choice, as it commonly comes with a lack of amenities, service, upkeep and concessions. While lower rent is attractive, there is much more value derived from concession packages. Additionally, if a business uses its own money for a buildout then they won’t have that capital available to invest in the business, making it a very costly way to use available funds.

Landlords gain a lot of value when they sign new tenants or retain existing ones, especially if the building is up for sale, and good landlords know a broker can help them do exactly that to increase the value of their building.

10 Years with the Tenant Advisory Group


10 Years with the Tenant Advisory Group _ TAG

Ten years ago, Tenant Advisory Group was founded to bring value to clients and partners, regardless of the need for a real estate transaction. In addition to being a highly experienced commercial brokerage firm, TAG’s mission was to be high-level connector and supporter to those who crossed our path. The company accomplishes its client support and best-in-class service by consistently demonstrating three core values: being responsive, following through and placing the client’s best interests first.

For the last 10 years, TAG has strived to provide partners with year-round support by referring business and creating strategic connections with value-adding professionals. Whether the client is large or small, TAG consistently outperforms its competition by delivering the best deal terms to its clients through these core values. When the team saves a client 25 percent on real estate costs, that is 25 percent the client can reinvest in their own business. TAG has not only been able to survive these last 10 years, but has thrived and grown.

The Tenant Advisory Group team is extremely thankful for our clients, partners and team and we look forward to the next 10 years of working for our clients’ best interests.

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