Choosing the Best Location for Your Office


Selecting the perfect location for your office is no easy task. It is vital to consider factors that will satisfy clients as well as employees. Keep in mind these important elements when searching for your new office location.

Accessibility

You want a space which clients can find easily and employees can comfortably commute to – perhaps close to public transportation or with a parking lot if many clients and employees will drive to reach you. Consider where your key employees live and whether the space is convenient for them.

Proximity

Think about what sorts of amenities you’d like in the surrounding area. Are there restaurants nearby for client meetings or are you close to any green space your employees can utilize to unwind and stay active? While the inside of your space is incredibly important, the area you’re located in provides an important first impression of your business.

Other Offices

If you have multiple offices, it’s imperative to understand what the commute between the two spaces will be like. Just as it’s important to have accessible transportation from your home to your office, it’s also important to secure a location that ensures an accessible commute amongst your various office locations.  

Strategic Partners

Take note of potential partners in your desired location. Situating your new office within a hub relevant to your industry can make all the difference in the ease of your partnerships and business deals. You are who you surround yourself with, so make sure you’re seeking spaces that work hard for your company.

Cultural Fit

Community culture means a variety of things depending on the area in which you’re looking. It’s essential to understand what role your business will play in the local culture. Does this culture align with your company’s values? What role would your company play in this community? Assimilation into your area is a necessity for success in your new location.

While there are many things to consider when choosing a location for your office, it all boils down to figuring out what your company needs to succeed and choosing a location that fits those ideals.

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Breakfast, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are your best practices for business development?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Bill Himmelstein – The best practice for business development for me has been doing business development for others.

Gary Breden – Relationships are the best means for developing businesses. Setting up channel partnerships.

Keith Glantz – Over-deliver with quality and then clients become the salespeople. Looking into the EOS model.

Jay Sharman – Best sales have been one degree of separation. I get most new clients organically by asking clients. I failed miserably when spending money on marketing.

Paola Meinzer – Focus on relationships. Be a part of different groups and be engaged in those groups.

Bill Gimbel – It’s not about selling. It’s about servicing and providing value. The ultimate compliment from a client is a referral. You should ask for the referral.

Ken Daemicke – Networking. Chambers, Rotary, NFP boards. Get involved. Ask: “How can I help you?”

Dominic Rinaldi – Using your phone works! Calling an owner of a business has been the most effective practice for business development. I use a CRM system and mine the data. If under $10m, around 2x-5x of adjusted EBITDA. The owner needs to stick around to transition relationships.

Zori Haouchine – Personal connections have been the most important. I want to focus on doing the things I want to do.

Paul Pagel – Growth through software wave. Started based on relationships. You can’t scale care. I did it through employee ownership. I want to transition to a team running the company.

Ben Olson – Channel partnerships like PE firms, they’re great people to work with. I want to get people together more.

Michael LaVista – Our marketing is excellent deliverables. 70% of our business is from other software companies. I’m going to write a book this year.

Charlie Franklin – I join and participate in organizations.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who are interested in attending future TAG events, please

email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List

Keith Glantz, President & Chief Creative Officer, Glantz Design

Jay Sharman, CEO/Founder, TeamWorks Media

Paul Pagel, CEO, 8th Light

Bill Gimbel, President, LaSalle Benefits

Michael LaVista, Founder & CEO, Caxy Interactive

Steve Brown, President Stratego, Partners

Zori Haouchine, Founder & Creative Director, ZOHA Architecture & Design

Jay Sharman, Founder & CEO, Team Works Media

Dan Dooley, CEO, Morris Anderson

Mike Olson, Director of Acquisitions, DecisionOne Dental

Domenic Rinaldi, Managing Partner, Sun Acquisitions

Ken Daemicke, Partner, Mueller

Paola Meinzer, Partner, Manning Silverman

Ben Olson, Founding Partner, Faircourt Partners

Charles Franklin, Managing Partner, Franklin Law Group

Jay Page, Co-Founder, CEO, Grey Street Capital

5 Things to Consider When Searching For A New Office


Relocating and choosing a new office space is a lot of work, no matter the size of your company. However, it also provides an exciting opportunity to start fresh in a new space. Carefully consider the following points to ensure you get the most out of your move.

Location

Select a location that works for both clients and employees. You want a space which clients can find easily and employees can comfortably commute to – perhaps close to public transportation or with a parking lot if many clients and employees will drive to reach you. Consider where your key employees live and whether the space is convenient for them.

Cost

Find a space that doesn’t stretch your finances too thin. Make sure to calculate the full cost of the space and consider any hidden costs carefully to make sure nothing sneaks up on you (parking, utilities, any necessary construction, taxes, phone & data set up, janitorial, new furniture, etc).

Physical Space

Look for a space that will allow room for growth. Opt for a space that could potentially accommodate a growing team or evolve with your business. Also, check that any new space has sufficient area to allow for breaks and group or client meetings.

Infrastructure

As you evaluate your options, look for a space with easy-to-use and secure IT systems, particularly if you need a reliable internet connection for your business to function properly. Understand and test the current technological infrastructure of each space you consider to ensure it can accommodate your business needs or if a potentially expensive build-out may be required.

Employee Needs  

Think about what amenities you’d like your new space to offer employees. Sunshine can be a great easy perk as access to natural light can affect mood, energy levels and alertness. See if your new location has space for a stocked beverage center or coffee bar. Also, consider investing in employees’ health with an on-site fitness center or dedicated wellness room.

West Loop Fuels LaSalle Street Renaissance


As rental rates continue to rise for commercial space in the near west side, companies moving to LaSalle Street and the Loop are reaping the benefits. The Loop has been experiencing a strong push in building upgrades, amenities and renovations thanks to the success of River North and River West. The end result is a healthy inventory of updated vacant space with tremendous amenities in traditionally high-demand neighborhoods. Here are a few things to consider when selecting your next office:

Supply & Demand

Areas like LaSalle Street and the Central Loop, which historically have been seen as high-demand and high-priced, are actually offering more for the money than neighborhoods like River West, Fulton Market and West Town.

Proximity vs. Practicality

While the allure of being close to Google and McDonalds is enough for people to pay higher rents for lower quality and little to no amenities, savvy business owners are taking advantage of lower rental rates and getting centrally located spaces in great buildings.

Location Fundamentals

Real estate will always be about location. When finding the right office, consider where it’s located in proximity to employees, current clients, potential clients and vendors. Remember that if the space is out of the way, it will make it difficult for prospective clients to find the business.

Executive Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Luncheon, attendees were prompted with the question, “What are some of your best practices for finding new clients?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Pete Horvath – Word of mouth is the biggest growth. Meeting with property managers, realtors, and real estate owners.

Dan Porcaro  – Build a culture of selling. Encourage all team members to network, sell and get in front of others. Everyone does it.

Jonathan Rothstein – When you serve as a trusted advisor, you can help your clients with great service providers. Always do good work and keep clients’ best interests at heart.

Ruth Minnick – Networking is extremely important. It’s a lifestyle. Connect on a personal level. Follow the money. Follows hiring patterns. M&A. Funding.

Jennifer Nemec – How to be of service. All work comes from referrals and website lead gen. Doesn’t do any marketing.

Marie Hale – Teach sales as a culture. Sales is simply being the best service to the person sitting across from you.

Jeff Asperger – Following up and following through.

Luca Lanzetta – It’s about the service you provide. Become a client of who you want to do business with.

Tim Schumm – Follow up is so important. Have systems and processes in place to make sure you stay on top of the follow-up. Much business comes on 5th or 7th touch.

Anne Gehring – Using Hubspot which is free as a CRM. Helps with follow up.

Barbara Best – Develop strong personal relationships with clients and understand how to help them be successful in their careers. Focus on paying it forward. Publishing.

Dan Golden – Was all referrals for the first 6 years. Would get work from large agencies who couldn’t do what they did. Use Hubspot as it supports keeping in touch with people. Leverage tools to stay top of mind. Referrals still drive a majority of their deals. Started a referral program. Not being afraid for asking for the referral. I also us a platform called Gaggle.

Eric Wasson- Sales is the most important thing. As far as channel partners it’s the best way to sell. Biggest mistake was saying no to Salesforce partnership in 2004. A Salesperson is hardest to hire and hardest to fire.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who is interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Dan Porcaro, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Porcaro Stolarek Mete Partner, LLC

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior Vice President, MB Financial Bank

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Manager, Client Executive, Unispace

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Tim Schumm, Founder & President, Lucas James Talent Partners

Pete Horvath, Leprechaun, Move-tastic

Mason Awtry, CEO, Rightsize Facility

Marie Hale, Co-Founder & CEO, Revenue

Jim Lencioni, President, ARIA Group Architects

Rasheed Hammouda, Co-Founder, Bridge Financial Technology

Anne Gehring, Founding Partner, Stanton Blackwell

Luca Lanzetta, Founder & CEO, Luca Lanzetta LLC

Pete Horvath, President, Move-Tastic

Dan Golden, Co-Founder, BeFoundOnline

Eric Wasowicz, Investor/Advisor, Greenbrier Group

Jennifer Nemec, Founder & Chief Creative Office, Ideation Studios

Barbara Best, Founding Partner & Principal, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Eric Wasson, Director, Customer Logistics, Ryder Supply Chain Solutions

218 S. Wabash, suite 280, Chicago, IL 60604


 

Description: Here is an opportunity to sublease a fully-furnished property in Chicago’s Loop. This space is a newly built loft-style office with exposed ceilings. There is a large collaborative kitchen area, 11 workstations, 3 large offices/breakout rooms, 2 small offices/phone rooms, and a lounge area.

The sublease is move-in-ready and available immediately. The least is set to expire on April 30th, 2025.

Size:2,438 SF

Cost: $23.50/sf MG

Location: 218 S Wabash, suite 280, Chicago, IL 60604

Why You Need a Real Estate Attorney During Lease Negotiations


When negotiating a new lease or lease renewal for commercial office space, many business owners and operators believe they can use a trusted family lawyer, IP, tax, corporate or other non-real estate attorney to help mediate terms. While it may be tempting to choose a lawyer you’re familiar with over an expert in real estate, it’s critical to find legal counsel that specializes in real estate law to ensure the best outcome. Together with a skilled broker, a commercial real estate attorney will save clients money and mitigate the risks inherent in any transaction. Here are a few of the most common scenarios during lease negotiation that demonstrate the importance of going with a real estate lawyer.

Prioritizing the Essential Elements

Attorneys that specialize in real estate law know how to prioritize the numerous clauses in a lease and fight for their client on issues of crucial importance. A common trap for lawyers who are unfamiliar with commercial real estate are the provisions dealing with unforeseen incidents or disasters, such as how quickly a landlord is required to repair a space after a fire. While this may seem like an important item to negotiate, there are more urgent areas to focus on, such as hold over rate or relocation language. Attorneys familiar with the intricacies of real estate know that disasters, such as fires, are extremely rare in today’s commercial office buildings. Haggling back and forth for extended periods of time on issues that may never occur only costs a client more money.

Capitalizing on Opportunities

Real estate lawyers know how to take a potentially negative clause in a lease and turn it into a positive opportunity for their client. For example, landlords frequently wish to reserve the right to relocate an existing tenant after a lease has been signed in order to create room for an incoming tenant that requires a larger, contiguous space. Rather than sink a deal over this issue, a real estate attorney will negotiate the terms of the lease so that any relocation will be to a higher floor with better views, with the landlord covering the costs of the move and build-out of the new space.

Learning on the Fly

It’s no secret that legal counsel is costly and work is billable by the hour. Thus, clients shouldn’t want their attorneys to be learning on the job. Unfortunately, this is what often happens when you hire a lawyer that you have a personal relationship with but who has no real estate experience, as they will need to study the new terms. This can also reduce the effectiveness of the broker, whose deal-making prowess can be stifled by an inexperienced attorney. All in all, going with a real estate attorney can save you substantial money on legal fees.

The field of law is much like medicine, in that lawyers specialize in a specific area of expertise. You may trust a long-time general counsel who has helped out in other matters, but working with an attorney who’s well versed in real estate will help mitigate risk, save money and ensure the lease you sign is the best possible deal. Lease negotiations can be complex and contentious, and you’ll want an expert on your side to secure a successful transaction.

Tenant Advisory Group’s Fall Networking Events


Local business leaders gathered at the Executives Breakfast and Luncheon to network with other entrepreneurs and examine a number of topics that are currently affecting their businesses.

During the Executives Breakfast, guests discussed what they were doing to get in front of potential new clients. Here are some of the many responses:

Michael Grace, CEO, Vetted Placements: Networking is key. Go to the nice bars and nice restaurants and meet people. Think outside the box. Don’t hesitate to do cold emails and cold calling. When that doesn’t work, send the overnight FedEx, because people think it’s important.

Gary Breden, Business Performance Advisor, Insperity: Identify who the ideal client is, and then identify who can put you in front of those people. Going to events, developing affiliate programs and channel partners are all important. Build partnerships.

At the Executives Luncheon, participants were posed the question, “What employee-management issues have you struggled with in the past year, and how did you overcome it?” Here are a few of the responses:

Michael Nowak, CFO, ABN Amro: It’s a challenge to inherit a team that was not previously managed. Try to give them opportunities without taking a step backward.

Joseph Antunovich, FAIA, Founder & President, Antunovich Associates : We have a hard time with the lack of loyalty. My advice is to be loyal, be nice and be hardworking. People are our most valuable asset.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who is interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List:

Sponsored by Gary Breden, Business Performance Advisor, Insperity

Mason Awtry, President, Rightsize Facility

Kyle Deming, Founder, Wojo Design

Bob Domenz, CEO, Avenue Marketing Strategy & Activation

Atish Doshi, President & Founder, Black Sheep

Charles Falls, President, Demi & Cooper Advertising

Matt Gibbs, Co-Founder, UPshow

Michael Grace, CEO, Vetted Placements

Andy Hulett, Partner, EmPower HR

Jim Kales, CEO, Aspire

Larry Kaul, CEO, Kaul Sales Partners

Richard Kincaid, Founder & Managing Principal, Sage Greenlife

Julie Kolodziej, Managing Partner, Matlin Law Group

Kevin Krumm, CEO, Objective Paradigm

Rich Lenkov, Managing Partner, Bryce Downey & Lenkov

Stan Logan, Chairman, Quality Back Office

Neal McNamara, Co-Founder, Virtas Partners

Chris Miller, Managing Partner, Kelley Kronenberg

Dave Norris, COO, RedRidge Finance Group

Domenic Rinaldi, Managing Partner, Sun Acquisitions

Josh Strauss, CEO, Pekin Singer Strauss

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List:

Joseph M. Antunovich, FAIA, Founder & President, Antunovich Associates  

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Barbara Best, Founding Partner, Capital Strategies Investment Group

Adam DeGroot, President, DeGroot Logistics

Laura Dribin, CEO & Founder, Peritius Consulting

Morrie Elstein, VP, Cendrowski Corporate Advisors

Christopher Gandy, Founder & President, Midwest Legacy Group

Larry Marin, VP, Near North National Title  

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Director, Unispace

Michael Nowak, CFO, ABN Amro

Mike Perich, Sewing Supplies Division CEO, Bernina International

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior VP, MB Financial Bank

Tim Schumm, President & Founder, Lucas James Talent Partner

Steve Whittington, Founder & CEO, LifeWorking Enterprises  

Kate Winston, Agency Lead – Strategy & Growth, EnvisionIt  

Tenant Advisory Group’s Fall Networking Events


The September Executives Breakfast and Luncheon inspired a number of great discussions and offered Chicago business leaders the opportunity to broaden their networks.  

At the Executives Breakfast, attendees discussed “creating work-life balance and how to manage work-from-home employees.” Here are some of the many responses:

Mike Maddock, Founder & CEO, Maddock Douglas: You don’t live to work; you work to live. The example the founders set is what the employees will follow. Don’t let people down.

Grant Gochnauer, Co-Founder & CTO, Vodori: Culture is a big component, and founders set the tone of the culture. It depends on where you are in the life of the business. There’s a sense of community, team dynamics and trust that is hard to facilitate when working remotely. Likewise, it’s hard to optimize remote work.

During the Executives Luncheon, guests were asked, “What have you done to create strong cultures in your organization?” Here are a few of the responses:

Michael Reddy, President, Digital Authority Partners: 1. Create shared goals and objectives, as we are trying to avoid silos. We have a few goals set that reach across the entire company. 2. Be good to people and offer full healthcare, strong 401ks and an open vacation policy. Don’t set hours of working. Work hard, remain available, communicate and be transparent to help the team understand priorities and what is on the horizon.

Jeremy Bird, CEO, 270 Strategies: We take space very seriously and have no doors. We are promoting a culture of transparency. We bring everyone together twice a year for company-wide retreats. We have a call every Tuesday for “triple bottom line.” Impact, innovation, and profit.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who is interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List:

Chris Beaulieu, Owner, Christopher Beaulieu & Associates

Mike Berntsen, CEO, Penthouse111 & Gentlemen’s Cooperative

Robin Berthier, CEO & CO-Founder, Network Perception

Brian Black, Managing Director, Tenant Advisory Group

Gary Breden, Business Performance Advisor, Insperity

Mason Cole, Managing Partner, Cole Sadkin

Stephen Daday, Managing Partner, Klein, Daday, Aretos & Donoghue

Grant Gochnauer, Co-Founder & CTO, Vodori

Robert Jacobi, President, Arc Technology Group

Jeff Jozwiak, Principal & Co-Founder, Norcon

Greg Kris, Managing Partner, Kris Ampersand

Kevin Krumm, CEO, Objective Paradigm

Andy Mack, CEO, SnapMobile

Mike Maddock, Founder & CEO, Maddock Douglas

Craig Manske, Managing Principal, Development Solutions Inc

Mark Meyer, Founder, E&M Strategic Development

Domenic Rinaldi, Managing Director, Sun Acquisitions

Mitchell Roth, Managing Partner, Much Shelist

Jon Talty, Chairman & CEO, OKW Architects

Tim Van Mieghem, Partner, The ProAction Group

Jim Vaselopulos, Founder, CEO, Rafti Advisors

Jeremy Waitzman, Partner, SFGH

Jessica Wu, COO, Vetted Placements

Igor Zhizhin, President, American Street Capital

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List:

Jim Anfield, Principal, Aptitive

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Jeremy Bird, CEO, 270 Strategies

Fred Bliss, CTO, Aptitive

Timothy Czmiel, Managing Partner, Virtas Partners

Jeff Durocher, CMO, Advance Search International

Daniel Ebert, COO, Greenheart

Morrie Elstien, VP, Cendrowski Corporate Advisors

Jessica Freiburg, Partner, Sassetti LLC

James Gustin, Partner, Fig Media

Rhonda Jensen, President, Jensen Litigation Services

Pat Monahan, CEO, Riverside Graphics

Dan Porcaro, CEO, PSM Partners

Michael Reddy, President, Digital Authority Partners

Mark Rickmeier, CEO, Table XI

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior VP, MB Financial Bank

David Sanchez, Founder & Director, 10 MGMT Agency

Mitch Weinstein,  Managing Partner, Chuhak & Tecson

Executives Networking with Tenant Advisory Group


Every month, Tenant Advisory Group hosts an Executives Breakfast and an Executives Luncheon to provide an opportunity for Chicago business leaders to build new, meaningful connections and discuss topics relevant to running a business.

During the Executives Breakfast, attendees were prompted with the question, “what is the best way to handle growth, and what do you wish you would have done differently?” Here are a few of the lessons shared in response:

Matt Green, Cofounder, VentureScale: Stay in your lane and focus on your role. Make sure you have goals set, and strive to achieve them.

Paul Detlefs, President, The Prestwick Group: Do not underestimate the power of delegation. Hire others to take stuff off your plate to focus your efforts. Consistently make an effort to simplify your business as you grow. Also, constantly look at the right structure for your business – is it the right time to take it to the next level? Should we spin off and outsource departments? Systematize your business and create process sooner.

Scott Nicholson, CEO, KO Business Solutions: I wanted to control everything and didn’t have systems and processes in place fast enough. Develop internal talent that grows with the company by creating a curriculum of classes that internal teams can take to develop.

At the Executives Luncheon, guests were asked, “what are some key lessons learned in growing a customer or client base?”

Zak Dabbas, CEO & Founder, Marco & Associates: Always look ahead to see what’s next. Never rest on your laurels. Maintain a clear and shared mission and vision, and breed a culture where everyone is an ambassador of the company. You’re only as good as the worst person on your team, so build a strong culture to elevate the level of energy and excitement at the office.

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Director, Unispace: Offer to provide value beyond services/products. Take care of each relationship, as you never know where it’s going to lead.

Thank you to all who attended!

If you’re a business owner with 20+ employees who is interested in attending future TAG events, please email Bill Himmelstein at Bill@TagCommercialBroker.com.

 

TAG Executives Breakfast Guest List

Mason Awtry, CEO, Rightsize Facility

Craig Castelli, Founder & CEO, Caber Hill Advisors

Paul Detlefs, President, The Prestwick Group

Kenny Estes, Cofounder, West Loop Ventures

Matt Green, Cofounder, VentureScale

Tom Gregg, President, Vehicle Acquisition Network

Josh Haid, Managing Partner, Women’s Divorce & Family Law Group

Rhonda Jensen, President, Jensen Court Reporting

Mike Kupfer, President & CEO, Black Diamond Solutions

Stan Logan, Chairman, Quality Back Office

Jim Macdonald, Managing Director, First Analysis

Andy Mack, CEO, SnapMobile

Joseph McCoy, Partner, Riley Safer Holmes & Cancila

Scott Nicholson, CEO, KO Business Solutions

Ben Renda, CEO, Global Capital

Ron Repking, Founding Partner, Sriracha Partners

Mitchell Roth, Managing Partner, Much Shelist, P.C

Karen Sanders, President, Sanders IT Consulting

Allan C Sutherland, Founder, President and CEO, In-telligent LLC

Rosemary Swierk, President, Direct Steel & Construction

 

TAG Executives Luncheon Guest List

Jeff Asperger, Partner, Meltzer Purtill & Stelle LLC

Lou Costabile, CFO, MasterMind Group

Zak Dabbas, CEO & Founder, Marco & Associates

David Diamond, Managing Partner, Kutchins, Robins & Diamond

Morrie Elstien, VP, Cendrowski Corporate Advisors

Charlie Franklin, Managing Partner, Franklin Law Group

Rick Gray, CEO, TalentRISE

James Gustin, Partner, fig Media

Michele Gustin, CEO and President, Fig Media

Celia Jones, CEO, The Escape Pod

Dan Kardatzke, President & CFO, Solstice

Bruce Menkes, Managing Partner, Mandell Menkes

Ruth Minnick, Global Business Development Director, Unispace

Dan Porcaro, CEO, PSM Partners

Mark Rickmeier, CEO, Table XI

Jonathan Rothstein, Senior VP, MB Financial Bank

Joanna Sobran, CEO, MXOtech

Rick Stearns, CFO, Origami Risk

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